THIS IS ONE REASON WHY BOKO HARAM AND OTHER SUB SAHARAN TERRORIST WONT WILL GIVE UP ON THEIR ARMS STRUGGLE

0

THIS IS ONE REASON WHY BOKO HARAM AND OTHER SUB SAHARAN TERRORIST WONT WILL GIVE UP ON THEIR ARMS STRUGGLE.
____________________________

The Somair mine is one of two uranium sites in Arlit that are largely owned and operated by Areva, a majority state-owned French nuclear-services company.

As an integral part of the nuclear-energy infrastructure of a foreign power, the mine was an irresistible target for jihadists exploiting the security vacuum in nearby Mali.

Even a failed attack in Arlit, and on a facility that does not produce or handle enriched uranium, seemed guaranteed to evoke Western fears of nuclear terrorism, vulnerable energy supply chains, and collapsing order in a country less than 1,000 miles from the Mediterranean coast.

But perhaps the most significant aspect of the attack wasn’t Al Qaeda’s success in detonating a bomb at the gates of one of the world’s largest uranium mines. Nor was it the fact that the global jihadist network had credibly threatened a facility that handles radioactive materials while its operatives killed dozens of people several hours away.

The deadliness, sophistication, and ambition of the attacks belied their inevitably negligible upshot. The uranium mines kept right on operating.

This continuity could be evidence of the overwhelming imperatives of resource extraction in an impoverished country with virtually no other industrial base. It could show the commitment of the mines’ French operators to remaining in business in the country, a French colony until 1960.

It could also reflect the economic and strategic commitment of the French government – which has 3,000 of its troops stationed across five Sahelian countries, including Niger – amid fears over jihadist advances in Algeria, Libya, and Mali.

But above all, the fact that the mines were so unaffected by the attacks shows just how separated Niger’s uranium mining industry is from its broader context.
Niger’s uranium industry is ‘an island’

For decades, the uranium industry has been an island within one of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable countries, a place which ranks nearly last on the Human Development Index and which will see its population of 17 million explode to over 50 million by mid-century.

The benefits of one of Niger’s few existing heavy industries are largely sequestered away from a population that is badly in need of them.

“Today, 80% of Nigeriens don’t even know Niger has uranium, and 99% never get any benefits from it,” Almoustapha Alhacen, the founder of the Arlit-based uranium industry watchdog group Aghir In’Man, speculated to Business Insider during an interview in Agadez.

The uranium industry constitutes over one-third of Niger’s exports. In France “one out of every three light bulbs is lit thanks to Nigerien uranium,” according to a 2013 Oxfam publication. Niger has the world’s fifth-largest recoverable uranium reserves, some 7% of the global total. Niger’s two major uranium mines are the country’s second-largest employer, aside from the government.

#Copied

Shares 0
Previous articleDatally: Google launches app to reduce high mobile data usage in Nigeria
Next articleArsenal – Man United Match: Mourinho opens up in a thriller
We help you make sense of an increasingly complex information world with a wide range of perspectives and stories that will allow you take an informed decision. We are proud of our African heritage and keep our eyes on the world. As online media, we see digitalization as the foremost opportunity to reach new readers, customers, and African emerging markets. We are independent in our approach. Our philosophy is grounded in the principles of a free society, which Africa is coming to terms with yet not losing the essence of what makes us African, which is our culture. ….showcasing the best part of us! www.etimes.com.ng ======================== info@etimes.com.ng ======================== etimes.nigeria@gmail.com Phone: +234 802 893 1940
SHARE